Invisible disabilities… Thank you Sault Ste. Marie…

I saw a new doctor this morning and as part of their intake I had to provide a list of my medical conditions. I started listing them but the nurse and I got stuck spelling the first of them, Osteogenesis Imperfecta, so I pulled up my medical ID on my phone. 18 conditions later they then made the ‘mistake’ of asking about my allergies. 13 allergies, including several anaphylaxis, later we were done. Thankfully, I’d actually thought to take a list of my current medications with me so I simply gave them the list rather than listing all 14.

As you can imagine going through that little lot gave me pause to think. Not one of my conditions is visible or readily apparent. My use of a service dog does mean that I’m disabled but other than that clue you would never know that I was invisibly disabled, let alone the extent of it.

Being a member of several service dog groups on Facebook I’m aware of a number of handlers that have access issues because ‘they don’t look disabled’ or ‘they’re too young to be disabled’. I guess at 47 that I don’t fit that last one anymore. However, I certainly fit the first.

Despite this, I’ve never had an access issue. Once, when staying in a hotel in the USA I was asked the two questions allowed by the ADA. But otherwise I’ve never even been asked for the doctor’s letter that I must carry with me in Ontario.

So I just wanted to thank the people in my town of Sault Ste Marie. Thank you for treating me as I wish to be treated. That is, just like everybody else.

Despite my long list of invisible disabilities people treat me as me, even with a service dog. Thank you!