Seasonal camping…

A little while ago I posted about my internal debate as to whether I should take a seasonal campsite this year, or travel as I have in the past. I said that I’d let you know my decision.

So, as you can probably tell from the title, I have decided to take a seasonal campsite for 2019. I’ll be staying at the Busy Beaver campground near Hilton Beach on St Joseph’s Island.

The site that I thought I wanted wasn’t initially available but the campground owners, Steve & Lorraine, offered me a different site which is nicely tucked in the trees and so it will get plenty of shade. This is essential with two large dogs, my being a red head and not having any air conditioning! Ironically the first site did become available but after discussion I decided to stay with the site we’d agreed on.

So for the past week or so I’ve been gathering together things that I’ll need. Some of which I had, and others I had to purchase. Hopefully, I’ve pretty much got everything now and if I really do forget something essential at least it’s only just under an hour’s drive door-to-door.

My new adventure starts this coming weekend. I have tickets to see Crystal by the Cirque du Soleil on Saturday. So I’ll be moving on site on Sunday with a plan of staying there until Friday and actually taking some vacation time.

There is no WIFI on site but I have a skyroam device that I want to check out. This device uses cell towers to create a secure WIFI network for a simple payment per day, month or year. I have 13 day passes so I’ll start with them and see how it goes. I’m pretty sure that it won’t be good enough for streaming video but hopefully it will allow me to access my work files so that I can come back to the site over the summer and work from ‘home’.

The weather forecast is a bit unsettling as rain is forecast for most of the week. The forecast keeps changing though so hopefully the rain will blow through before Sunday and I’ll have a dry camp. I’ll be taking wellington boots just in case. Mine aren’t bright pink like the ones in the picture but they’re still flowery!

So I’m starting a new adventure – a seasonal camp site. I’ll let you know how it goes…

Making tough decisions…

So last week I had to make a tough decision. I had intended to drive to Sudbury on Friday morning to attend Northern Constellations. This is a 2 day conference for faculty and staff who work at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM).

I have two stipendiary positions with NOSM. The first of which I have held for a number of years now which is as a committee member of the Theme 2 Committee which ensures that professionalism is integrated throughout the NOSM curriculum and education. This committee usually meets in person during the conference whereas we use video conference to facilitate our meetings for the rest of the year.

My second appointment is new this year as the Family Medicine Research Tutor for Sault Ste Marie.

So as NOSM faculty I was really looking forward to the event and meeting my colleagues in person. However, the closer the event came the more my anxiety increased. Finally, after not feeling well for a couple of days I checked my blood pressure and found it to be very high. So I started to consider not going.

Unfortunately I was then booked to stay in a different hotel to the one that the conference was in. So this meant that I’d have two hotels to manage my allergies in. Two lots of open areas and two bars and restaurants. That was the final straw. With much regret I cancelled my attendance in person and set up to join the Theme 2 meeting by video conference instead.

Within a couple of days my blood pressure dropped back down to normal and the general sense of illness went away. So I knew it was the right decision.

However, it was a really tough decision to make. Not so much missing the specific event but rather having to accept the restriction on my life. However, given that my citrus allergy appears to still be extremely sensitive it was the safe decision.

Will I ever be able to stay in a hotel again? Maybe. But I need to break it down into smaller pieces rather than trying to attempt a full conference. Perhaps a night in a local hotel using room service rather than eating in the restaurant and checking that they don’t provide a breakfast buffet, with fresh oranges, in their lobby area.

It might be possible. Maybe by next year’s conference, which will be in Thunder Bay, I’ll feel that the risk is out weighed by the benefits. Though having to fly up there adds another environment to manage.

Some days are tougher than others. Some decisions are extremely tough to make but all I can do is the best that I can and look out for my own safety. It would be a lot easier if all my health issues would just get in line rather than my having to work them all out together!

To seasonal camp or travel…

So, as some of you may remember, I bought a new little travel trailer back in September 2018. I say new, but it was made in 1972. So it’s just a year younger than I am. However, it’s in great shape and I had it completely re-wired, last year, before it went into storage for the winter.

Now that the new season is almost upon us (it starts the May long weekend) I have a decision to make. In the past I’ve always travelled with my trailer. I took my previous Boler to Prince Edward Island through Canada and to Rhode Island through the USA on different trips.

Last year I camped with my new trailer in Sturgeon Falls for the long weekend after buying it in North Bay. I like camping and I like travelling so it seems like I just need to decide where to travel to this summer.

So that was my original plan. I booked a shake-down camp in St Ignace the week following the long weekend in May and started planning a much longer trip to meet friends at their seasonal site in Alberta. But then I saw a posting by the Busy Beaver Campground on St Joseph’s Island just 45 minutes away. They have a few seasonal sites available. So yesterday I went out to see them for myself.

Two of the three sites wouldn’t work for me. One was very exposed and my fibreglass trailer would just become an oven without any shade. It had a great view of the water though! The second was tucked in between two other larger trailers. It had shade and a great view but I have two dogs and one of the big trailers had little children. I could see me spending my whole summer trying to get them to leave the dogs alone. It would also have been very difficult to enjoy if I didn’t get on with the owners of the two big trailers as I’d have to walk between their sites to get anywhere.

That brings me to the third. Which is tucked into the trees so it gets plenty of shade. It doesn’t have a perfect view but it’s not bad either and it’s less than a minute’s walk to get a better view. So I’m debating what to do…

Fortunately, Steve & Lorraine (owners and managers of the Busy Beaver Campground) don’t know for sure yet that the third site is available so I have some time to think. Do I want to try a year of seasonal camping in the same place?

On one level it appeals a great deal. Much as I love travelling it is a hassle to make and break camp every day or two. I love the idea of being able to leave clothes, things to do and some food there week to week.

It could be nice to be next to the same group of campers all summer. Though that could be bad too if we don’t get along! But I’m not too concerned with that as I can usually get along with most people and the campsite is strict about campers being quiet at night-time.

Not having a bathroom in my trailer the bathrooms on site were important to see and they are great. Newly renovated and exceptionally clean. They’re also accessed with a key so only campers on site can use them.

The good news is that the campsite doesn’t have WIFI. The bad news is that the campsite doesn’t have WIFI. Thankfully, I did have cell coverage by the office at least. I forgot to check at the actual campsites. So I wouldn’t be out of touch completely.

Given that I plan to spend most of my summer conducting a systematic review which entails a great deal of reading this could work out perfectly. Little distractions and plenty of time to work on my research. I just have to remember to make sure that I have copies of papers on my laptop itself and not just on my G drive.

So, assuming the site that I want is available I have to decide do I want to seasonal camp?

The maths is pretty simple. It works out that I need to spend 7-9 nights a month at the campsite to simply break even on what the cost of nightly camps would have been. If I am there more than that I gain.

Additionally, if I want to stay for next year I can store my trailer on the site and not have to move it. That appeals too and would save the storage fee that I’m currently paying.

Given my disabilities a seasonal site may be the safer option for me as well.

So it all comes down to the fact that I have to decide if I’m ready to have my wings clipped or not.

I’ll let you know what I decide…

Why I can no longer fly…

A couple of articles in the past week really hit home for me. Since developing RADS I have severely cut back the amount of travel that I do. In the past I have travelled all over the world and perhaps acted somewhat naively about my safety.

I’ve had one really bad experience on a plane where I reacted to an orange being eaten somewhere on the plane but was able to stabilize myself with medication. Thankfully, much of my travel has been international and as citrus fruits are on the list of prohibited foods for import in most cases I’ve been relatively safe. Additionally, airlines rarely give out fresh fruit.

However, my sensitivity is now much higher than it was. Unfortunately I found out yesterday that, at least to oranges, it remains extremely high. I was in a meeting and as it was breaking up a trolley of food & beverages was brought in for a meeting following ours. There was an orange on the trolley. A colleague notified me immediately and I left straight away thinking that I’d avoided a reaction. The orange was not peeled after all. However, on my way back to my car I suffered from some restricted breathing and had an asthma attack. So apparently, even an unpeeled orange is now an issue for me.

What I am interested to know is how long they were waiting outside the door before coming in. Kai, my service dog, started to be unsettled about 10 minutes before the end of the meeting. I put it down to being a long day as he’d been working since 9am and it was now 4pm. I wonder now if he was trying to tell me about the orange.

Anyway, to cut a long story short I don’t feel that it is safe for me to fly anymore as my allergy is so sensitive and airborne. I sit in wonder when I see people like Miss Allergic Reactor talk about how she travels the world extensively with a severe nut allergy.

In contrast, just this week two boys were taken off a flight due to a nut allergy and the airline being unwilling to accommodate them. I can only imagine what they’d say if I asked for accommodation for citrus fruits especially on a morning flight where they’d usually be serving orange juice with breakfast.

Thankfully, I have travelled a great deal so being restricted to places that I can now drive to isn’t such a big deal. I have all of North America to visit and that’s a lot of places!

Dipping a toe in the water…

In 2016 when I developed Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS) I was very disheartened to hear that the extreme hypersensitivity would likely last at least two years and could be permanent. Here I am, almost 3 years later and I’m finally willing to dip a toe in the water.

What I mean by this is that I’m willing to take a little more risk with my life and step outside what has become a very restricted comfort zone.

My hypersensitivity seems to have calmed down somewhat. However, there’s no really safe way to prove this as deliberately exposing myself to my known allergens seems like a suicidal option to me.

So I’m now playing a game of risk with my life. It started by really wanting to go to a concert (or three). So I bought my girlfriend tickets for us to attend Terri Clarke who was to perform here in Sault Ste Marie in February 2019.

In the interim I bought season tickets to the Sault Theatre Workshop. I attended their Fall and Christmas performances and had a great time. I’ve since attended another of their shows and will see the last of the season in May.

Given that these went well I was much more relaxed about attending the Terri Clarke concert as it was in the Sault Community Theatre Centre with a very limited cash bar. (Bars are an issue for me as they often have sliced, limes, lemons and oranges to garnish drinks).

So given that I’ve been able to successfully attend these events with just mild hives (held in check by the enormous amounts of antihistamines that I take daily) I’m planning to venture further afield in the next couple of months.

There are several events that I will be attending at the Van Andel Arena in Grand Rapids, Michigan. To be safe I’ve made sure that my travel insurance is up to date and will be attending each with somebody who knows my medical conditions and understands that I may need to leave part way through the performance if my allergic reaction gets to strong. Kai (service dog) will also be with me which helps a great deal. While he’s not trained to scent for my allergens (as they’re too prevalent at very low levels and he’d be alerting all the time) he is trained to react to any changes in my breathing and to alert and lead me away from the source. Thankfully, he can pick up on breathing changes a lot faster than I can. I just have to trust his instincts which have so far been 100% spot on.

So for anybody else with RADS there is light at the end of the tunnel. It might yet prove to be an oncoming train but so far, dipping a toe in the water with all appropriate precautions and plans for dealing with any issues that arise life, for me, is opening up a little once more.

I’ve even booked a campsite for midweek in May to start off my camping season. I’m hopeful that the snow on the ground now may have finally left by then! It’s been a winter of a lot of snow! If that trip goes well I’ll plan others all with my little Boler and dogs.

Sometimes being stubborn is what’s needed…

Sometimes it’s hard not to think that life is out to get me. On Monday, I posted about finally feeling like myself again having had a day out in the form of a road trip on Sunday.

On Monday I had some follow-up tests due to one of those rabbit holes we dropped down when trying to find the cause of my breathing issues, just as a precaution, and the results came in yesterday and they’re not good. So I’m back to that specialist next week.  First appointment after the holiday weekend.

It just seems that for the last year, or two, that every time I start to feel as so I’m getting a handle on life again that something else comes to try to knock me flat.

Well this weeble may have been slow in recovering her equilibrium over the past two years and it might be taking me longer to get back up; but I’m getting back up and will deal with this issue as it comes. I’ll also work hard at not worrying about the unknown and the suspected in the interim.

In reality nothing has changed since Sunday. I had the same issue then, I just didn’t know it. So I’m going to hold on to the good feeling from Sunday and use that to help me through the next few weeks.

I’m on the path to health and while it seems to be an especially twisty path I will get there!

I’m too stubborn not to!

 

 

Just for one day I started to feel like myself again….

Yesterday I felt like myself again, just for a day. It was wonderful. I packed up snacks and emergency survival equipment, loaded up the dogs and hit the road. It was wonderful to feel well enough to just drive….

So Molly, Kai and I went to visit the home of Winnie-the-Pooh, White River, Ontario.

The day was mostly spent driving as it’s a good 4 1/2 hours from Sault Ste. Marie. However, it was a nice sunny day for the most part. Though I drove through two storms on the way home just in time to beat the massive thunderstorm that hit last night.

Some gorgeous views and amazing sights. I saw moose and birds of prey. The lakes were starting to unfreeze so the edges were mixed between waves and open water and icebergs. Some of the waterfalls were just flourishing with the snowmelt.

I loved the sense of humour of whoever was naming some of the lakes. At one point there was ‘Mom Lake’ and ‘Dad Lake’ just next to it. Just as I was wondering what you’d call a third lake I came upon ‘Orphan Lake’ just far enough from Mom and Dad to be orphaned!

It was a lovely day out and the dogs loved the ride and the walk by the Winnie-the-Pooh memorial. Next time we’ll have to go when the museum is actually open and see if I can handle the scents.

However, for right now just getting out for the day was such a huge step for me after almost a year of being mostly housebound. I’m only extending my limits to my vehicle but now that I’m well enough to drive like that again…. it’s wonderful!!

Even with the thunderstorm last night all three of us slept well last night!!